A Different Kind of Farm



What is a Farm Sanctuary?

The easiest way to explain it is that we are like an animal shelter, but instead of dogs and cats, we take in traditionally farmed animals. Especially those who have been orphaned, abandoned, neglected, or abused. Cattle, horses, pigs, goats, sheep, chickens, turkeys, and ducks are just some of the species we care for. Whereas rescue organizations have adoption programs to find permanent homes for the animals they help, sanctuaries are that permanent home. Everyone that comes to our farm stays for the rest of their natural life. We provide food, shelter, medical care, enrichment, socialization and most importantly, love. Most farmed animals are viewed as commodities, and treated as such. Here they are members of our 'farmily', and always shown respect and compassion.

Are You a Petting Zoo?

Yes and no. In the sense that we are open to the public for visits, and we are a farm where many of the animals love people and enjoy hugs and scratches, yes. But we don't breed animals to have cute babies that draw in attention. We don't close our gates in the Fall and ship our animals off to become food. We have strict guidelines for visitor behaviour, and we are quick to enforce them when needed. The mental, physical and emotional well-being of our residents is our top priority. The animals interact with people by choice; they are not bribed with food or forced to be in close contact with humans, ever.

Sanctuary History

May 2014

Raelle relocated to Manitoba from the West Coast of British Columbia to be with her then-fiancĂ© Karl. The couple rescued six Silkie chicks from a livestock auction just days later, before Raelle was even unpacked.

April 2015

Archie the calf was born into Karl's father's beef herd. Rejected by his mother and gravely ill, Raelle nursed Archie back to health. Karl's father gifted Archie to his almost-daughter-in-law, and her childhood dream of having a farm sanctuary began to feel attainable.

February 2016

Karl and Raelle, who married in May 2015, officially registered the name Kismet Creek Farm with the province of Manitoba, and began steps to open to the public. The process would take much longer than anticipated, but they never gave up on their dreams.

July 2017

After a stressful year of construction and red tape (and a surprise baby boy in January 2017), the sanctuary passed all inspections and opened its gates to the public. The Schoenrocks volunteer their time at the sanctuary while working paying jobs elsewhere to make ends meet.